Last edited by Mikar
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

9 edition of Raising a child who has a physical disability found in the catalog.

Raising a child who has a physical disability

by Donna G. Albrecht

  • 248 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by J. Wiley in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.,
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Children with disabilities -- United States.,
    • Children with disabilities -- United States -- Family relationships.,
    • Parents of children with disabilities -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementDonna G. Albrecht ; foreword by Robert Miller.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV904 .A5 1995
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 228 p. :
      Number of Pages228
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1115849M
      ISBN 100471042404
      LC Control Number94041908
      OCLC/WorldCa31606253

      Unless they are raised with a disabled family member in the house, many children have a difficult time understanding what it means to be disabled. Disability awareness exercises increase children's. The BU Faculty & Staff Assistance Office has counselors with specialized experience in helping parents through the challenges of raising children with special needs. For counseling, support, or assistance finding resources and services for yourself or your child, .

      So your child needs plenty of opportunities for active play, both inside and outside. Health Minor childhood illnesses like colds, ear aches and gastroenteritis generally won’t have any long-term effects on development. But disability, developmental delay and chronic or .   RAISING A RARE GIRL A Memoir By Heather Lanier. Heavily pregnant with a second child, Heather Lanier deliberately read a book by a mother whose infant son was dying. She’s not a masochist, only.

      Disability. Supported By. Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health. Member Organisations. Raising a child who is mentally challenged requires emotional strength and flexibility. The child has special needs in addition to the regular needs of all children, and parents can find themselves overwhelmed by various medical, caregiving and educational responsibilities.


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Raising a child who has a physical disability by Donna G. Albrecht Download PDF EPUB FB2

Parenting a child who has a physical disability can be complicated. This book will make your job easier. Compassionate, helpful, and based on real-life experience, it will help you handle every facet of raising and loving your special child, including: * Finding the right physical and mental health professionalsCited by: 3.

Parenting a child who has a physical disability can be complicated. This book will make your job easier. Compassionate, Raising a child who has a physical disability book, and based on real-life experience, it will help you handle every facet of raising and loving your special child, including: * Finding the right physical and mental health professionals * Solving stressful situations within the family * Boosting your child's.

(Jean-Paul Richard, parent of four children, one of whom has a physical disability) "This is a book you will read, share, and read again.

It focuses on the goal of all parents: to raise children who are capable, confident, and ready for adulthood. The authors’ suggestions are practical, realistic, and illustrated by a variety of family stories."5/5(4). Parenting a child who has a physical disability can be complicated.

This book will make your job easier. Compassionate, helpful, and based on real-life experience, it will help you handle every facet of raising and loving your special child, including: Finding the right physical and mental health professionals Solving stressful situations within the family Boosting your child's confidence and.

Furthermore at the back of this book there is a handy resources list that the reader can refer to for further help and assistance with regards to raising a child with a physical disability. What were the highlights. One major highlight of this book is how each chapter of the book is personal to a different family or set of individuals.

Playing is crucial to healthy development and for building strong parent-child bonds. It's equally important if your child has a physical disability, such as a hearing impairment, vision. Disability. A-Z health reference. Supported By. Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government.

Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

Raising a Resilient Family When One of Your Children Has a Physical Disability Kay Harris Kriegsman, Ph.D., and Sara Palmer, Ph.D. Supporting and encouraging all members of the family when a child has a physical disability.

Parents who have a child with physical handicaps often have questions about parenting and family life that are not included in the typical advice book.

Kriegsman seeks to help parents who are looking for ways to adapt their family’s way of life to support their child without sacrificing the child’s ability to meet his or her full potential/5. Teaching Your Child about Peers with Disabilities. What better day than today to publish this post.

Today is the first day of Developmental Disabilities Awareness month. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”.

Buy Just One of the Kids: Raising a Resilient Family When One of Your Children Has a Physical Disability (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) by Kriegsman, Kay Harris, Palmer, Sara (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on Reviews: 2.

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities establishes that children with “long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments” should enjoy the same human rights and freedoms as other children.

The Convention goes on to say: “In all actions concerning children with disabilities, the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration,” and. In the U.S., there are at least 4 million parents with significant disabilities who are raising children under age This includes parents who have a physical disability, parents who are deaf, parents who are blind, parents with chronic illnesses, parents who have an intellectual disability and parents who have a psychiatric disability.

The majority of literature around parenting a child/adult child with intellectual disabilities (ID) focuses on the child as the ‘negative stressor’ and the negative impact or burden the child will have on the parent or family over their lifespan.

This includes experiencing higher levels of psychological distress and/or depressive symptoms. [Featured Image Description: Book cov er for ‘ King For A Day.’ T he rest of the images in this post are book covers from the preceding text].

This is the third in a four-part series on disability in children’s books: In this post, you’ll find stories starring disabled characters who aren’t defined by disability, teach your kids to see disabled people as peers worthy of respect, and.

The Impact of Childhood Disability: The Parent's Struggle by Ken Moses, Ph.D. Moses is a psychologist who has devoted himself to helping people deal with crisis, trauma and loss. He is a nationally renowned speaker, author, and clinician who has focused much of his work on parents of impaired children and disabled adults.

Children with disability: videos. Supported By. Raising Children Network is supported by the Australian Government. Member organisations are the Parenting Research Centre and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute with The Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Community Child Health.

Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) (7) highlight how children with disabilities have the same rights as other children—for example to health care, nutrition, education, social inclusion Down syndrome, and children with hearing, visual, physical, communication and intellectual impairments.

A number of children have a single. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Just One of the Kids: Raising a Resilient Family When One of Your Children Has a Physical Disability (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

Introduction: raising children--resilient and ready for adulthood --Getting the news --Coming home --Inclusive parenting: make it work for you --Brothers and sisters: siblings sharing family life with physical disability in the mix --Grandparents: seeing through a new lens --Opening doors to inclusion --Letting one dream go to let another grow.

First, the finding that raising a child with a disability has physical health consequences for parents suggests that programs for these parents should not be confined to relieving their emotional distress; the availability and access to tangible support such as day care and respite care facilities in the community may be as important as the.Just because someone has a physical disability (when a part or parts of the body do not work well) does not mean they necessarily have a cognitive (or thinking) disability.

Children with disabilities can do many of the things your child does, but it might take them longer. They may need assistance or adaptive equipment to help them.The physical demands of caring for a child can be tremendous, and this applies even more to those with sick or disabled children.

along with the child-raising responsibilities and daily household obligations that must be accomplished. With the added accountability of caring for a child with a chronic illness, they are at an increased risk.